Hey guys,

I am happy to announce our latest game order. This one is filled with some awesome new games that I can’t wait to teach all of you. I have found some real winners. Some of these games will be played soon at game club, others will see the table during the  summer camps, but all will bring some good laughs. Take a look below and see what is in store for you.

With this big order comes some big responsibilities. I would like to find out who would like to lend a helping hand to Game Club. I have some things I would like to have done by my student players. I need some organized people to unbox these games. This is a big help as it get the games ready for the players to dive right into the action. Secondly, and this is a big one, I would like to have students learn some of these games at home and come teach them at a game club. This is not easy and I would like to reward players who take their training to the next level by giving some upgrades and special badges and awards that are only earned by players that can do this task. Lastly, I would like to get back to review and teaching some games videos we create together. If it would interest you to create a video review please come see me. This is not an easy process and will require some work at home as well as at recess or before school.

Below are the descriptions from the game companies and not my own descriptions. They all look cool. Please write below if you are interested in helping and what you think about the new games/expansions.

New Games:

Early Italy, 600 BCE – Five city states are vying each other for superiority in the region: Roma with their Roman inhabitants, Velletri with the Volscian inhabitants, Reate with their Sabin inhabitants, Veii with their Etruscian inhabitants, and Alba Longa with their Latin inhabitants. Each player controls a city state and tries to be the first to have 16+ population and 10 monuments. This city state is destined to be a glorious power of the Ancient World!

A game of Alba Longa offers a fine combination of dice selection, city management, and worker assignment (inside your own city), and is spiced up with the ingredient of city combat (soldiers and heroes)! Inside the box are three big variants – Assisi, A Job Well Done, and Spoils of War – which can be added and combined at your will and which add even more longevity to this game!

 

In the card game Race for the Galaxy, players build galactic civilizations by playing game cards in front of them that represent worlds or technical and social developments. Some worlds allow players to produce goods, which can be consumed later to gain either card draws or victory points when the appropriate technologies are available to them. These are mainly provided by the developments and worlds that are not able to produce, but the fancier production worlds also give these bonuses.

At the beginning of each round, players each select, secretly and simultaneously, one of the seven roles which correspond to the phases in which the round progresses. By selecting a role, players activate that phase for this round, giving each player the opportunity to perform that phase’s action. For example, if one player chooses the settle role, each player has the opportunity to settle one of the planets from their hand. The player who has chosen the role, however, gets a bonus that applies only to him. But bonuses may also be acquired through developments, so one must be aware when another player also takes advantage of his choice of role.

 

In this corporation-themed game, players compete to be the first to acquire four out of six possible victory points. You earn a point by reaching certain numbers along tracks, such as at least 7 on the influence track or 8 on the majority track. You also may earn a point by beating your secretly assigned archenemy on three specified tracks.

The game lasts a number of rounds, with each round consisting of a directors’ meeting, followed by 4-7 turns. At the meeting, the “company chairman” is replaced (the next token in line moves up) and the “division heads” are named (by seeing who has the majority in each column of placed cubes). Chairmen and heads get salary bonuses and a card detailing a single advantage for the cardholder.

The player who’s the “communications” head then secretly looks at the Event cards and determines in which order they will be played (and so how many turns will be in the current round). Other heads’ cards will let them pay less for stocks, for example, or place or remove bits.

After each event card is revealed, players select one action to perform, such as “hiring and relocating employees” (placing or moving cubes), resigning as a department head, using an advantage card, or bribing players for their advantage cards. These actions result in points on the scoring tracks and sometimes money (which is only used for bribery and buying blocks of stock). A bribed card has more power than an earned one, giving incentive to accept bribes (the card is less useful or even useless to the original owner, depending on the workers’ happiness scale). In addition to bribery getting you a power you want, it also moves you up the corruption track. A player who rejects a bribe, however, loses one cube on the majority columns.

It’s not a business simulation, and gameplay isn’t as dastardly as the theme implies. The event cards provide most of the humor. (The card may read that you have failed to fix the breakroom game table, or vacations were canceled, so worker satisfaction goes down, which is what you want). The feel of rising through the ranks (getting more points) is there, and there are many things to attempt to excel in, by doing various business-related (at least in name) actions. Efficient manipulating of your opportunities will win you victory points and, if you gain four, the game.

1812 – The Invasion of Canada

The year is 1812. War is raging across Europe and Russia. Napoleon, emperor of France, is seeking to dominate Europe through conquest. France’s enemies, led by England, are engaged in a desperate struggle to defeat Napoleon. England, in dire need of men, is impressing men to serve in its navy. Included are Americans who are pressed into service at gunpoint.

The young American nation objects. Eager to defend its sovereign rights and to strengthen its position in North America, the United Stated declares war on Britain on June 18, 1812. Taking advantage of the British Army being occupied in its struggles against Napoleon, American forces invade Canada in order to drive the British from its last remaining colony on North American soil. Surprised, Britain reels from the attack and now has to face another enemy threat on another front.

In 1812 – The Invasion of Canada, players take on one of the roles of the major factions that took part in the War of 1812. On the British side these are represented by the British Regulars (Redcoats), Canadian Militia and Native Americans; and the American Regular Army and American Militia comprise the American players. Players for each side will cooperate with each other in order to plan and conduct their campaigns. Each side will attempt to capture Objective Areas on the map. When a truce is called, the side that controls the most enemy Objective Areas wins.

 

This one, designed with Bruno Cathala, started with the theme. We wanted to make a game about colonizing Mars, with shuttles leaving the blue planet towards the red one. The theme is strong, and well caught in the steampunk graphic style decided by Asmodée. In Mission: Red Planet, each player plays a colonial power which sends astronauts, in space shuttles, to occupy the most promising zones on the planet. For scholars, the systems merge a majority game, à la El Grande or San Marco, with a character/action card system, somewhere between Citadels and Hoity Toity/Adel Verpflichtet. Nothing really new here, but there was much work on it and we’re really proud of the result.

 

In 1413, the new king of England, Henry V of Lancaster, has ambitious plans: The unification of England and the conquest of the French crown! Each player takes the role of an ambitious aristocratic family. Who will be the best supporter of this young king, and the most powerful Lord of his time?

In Lancaster the players want to proceed from simply being a Lord to the most powerful ally of the king. They may achieve this by developing their own knighthood as well as by clever deployment of individual knights in the counties of England, at their own castle, and to conflicts with France. In parliament, they try to push laws from which they will benefit themselves most. The player with the most power points at the end of the game is the winner.

Every turn, players send their knights to the different locations:
• Counties, where they compete with knights from other players for rewards and the favor of the nobles.
• The castle, to receive income or new knights.
• Into conflict with France, where all players combine their power and try to gain power points.

In the counties the strength of the knights is important as you can remove the knight of another player by placing a knight of your own with higher strength in the same location.

 

Rarely is a game stripped down to its bare essense as cleanly as this game is. Up to sixteen deals can be made over the course of the game, and a player who successfully makes a deal is given a certain amount of money. In order to close the deal, however, he will need to seek help from the other players in exchange for a piece of the payoff. Complicating matters quite bit, each player has a hand of action cards which can be used to derail negotiations. After ten deals have been made, a die is rolled each turn to determine if the game is over, with the victory going to whoever has the biggest bankroll.

A board game with nobles rising to power in the Provinces and the Royal courts of 16th-18th century Europe. There is a hierarchy of nobles and players compete to get the best nobles in each area to gain control of countries.

Players collect sets of cards – like Gold, Troops, Dueling Skills, Titles, Castles, Bishop – to raise nobles in four European countries: England, France, Spain and the German States.

There are different paths to victory: getting the first noble in as many provinces as possible, dominating a country, having a noble in every province and capital of a country, getting the full set of 7 different nobles first and having the most of each rank of noble at the end of the game.

Treachery cards are played to remove opponent’s nobles and replace them with your own line of nobles: methods include- the guillotine, Spanish Inquisition, the axeman, the gallows and assassinations.

 

 

Nexus Ops is a light-medium science fiction war game. The game boasts a hexagonal board that is set up differently every time, as well as (in the Avalon Hill edition) cool “glow” miniatures and lots of combat. Players control competing futuristic corporations that battle each other for control of the moon’s Rubium Ore. By winning battles and fulfilling Secret Missions, you can obtain victory points.

Units are composed of various alien races and have stats similar to those used in the Axis & Allies series. Combat is also similar. Players who lose battles are compensated with Energize cards which grant them special powers later. Players can also obtain Energize cards by controlling the Monolith, a raised structure in the center of the grid. The first person to reach the required number of victory points wins the game.

 

THE COWBOYS is our game of the Old West. 2 – 10 Cowboys (players) shoot it out in 10 – 60+ minutes. The game features stand-up Cowboy Counters artistically designed with full color artwork by Gary S. Zaboly. There are 26 Historical and Hollywood style scenarios in the game. Six double-sided geomorphic mapboards create the battlegrounds of the Old West.

The game rules allow you to pick up and play the game in minutes. The optional rules add chrome but still keeps the game very playable. The “Old West” personalities are there; Wyatt, Doc, Jesse, Billy, and many other legends of the Wild West. Some of the variables include town folk,horses, etc.

Bank robberies, cattle rustling, stagecoach holdups, jail breaks, lynch mobs, and many other western actions are depicted. It pits opposing sides against each other, bringing to life the daring and dastardly deeds of heroes and villains when the way of the gun ruled the day. Included are the lawmen, gunfighters, gamblers, and ne’er do wells who knew how to handle themselves during a gunfight. Also the town folk will show up to add a much needed gun to the fight.

Every person has dreamed of being the cowboy standing in the middle of street, alone, staring down your enemy, fingers twitching by the side of your gun belt, looking for the flinch in your adversaries face that will unleash blazing steel from your side…now is your chance…but watch your back!

Game includes hard mounted geomorphic map boards, counters, stand-up cowboy counters, plastic bases, dice, box, rules, scenario book, cards, and other game play materials.

 

The players must try to build the most valuable, or the most useful districts. However, the core of the gameplay revolves around role selection. Players secretly choose a character card and pass on the rest – starting with whoever has the crown. Each character has a special ability, and the usefulness of any character depends upon your situation, and that of your opponents. If you are too obvious in your movements, you may meet an untimely death at the hands of an assassin, or a thief may whisk away all of your precious gold.

Once someone has built eight districts, the round continues until all other players have taken their actions, and then the game ends. The player with the most victory points wins. Victory points are determined by the gold value of buildings, but it is also important that players have a varied city, and complete their districts with haste if they are to see any bonus points.

Citadels had a separate expansion, Citadels: The Dark City Expansion, but the new (3rd Edition) Fantasy Flight edition comes with the expansion included (the Hans im Glück tin box also included it). With the newer version that includes Dark City, or the Dark City expansion purchased separately, Citadels supports a maximum of 8 players.

A second edition of the German version of the game came in a tin box and included the Dark City expansion as well as three additional cards. It is separately listed at Citadels.

Expansions:

 

An official expansion to Glenn Drover’s Empires: The Age of Discovery, the Builder Expansion contains:

1) A NEW SPECIALIST: THE BUILDER
Abilities:
a) When placed on the colonist dock and sent to the New World it will increase the VP’s scored for the region: +4 VP/Builder (of any color) for 1st place; +2 VP/Builder for second place. (The idea is that the colony is much more developed with cities and infrastructure).
b) When placed in the Capital Building track, the player pays $5 less.

The Builder may be acquired via new Capital Buildings or when a player places a colonist on the 5th spot (Builder is Free, other specialists cost 5)

2) 20 NEW CAPITAL BUILDINGS
These include some “buildings” that cost zero, but offer a one-time instant effect such as $7, 2 free specialists, and 2 free trade goods. So even if a player is short on cash, a building action is available.

3) A RULES SHEET with the new Builder Rules, Capital Buildings, and even special rules for a historical start (Each Nation has a special ability and one or two Capital Buildings to start the game). The idea is that the Spanish will feel like the Spanish (Conquistadors, etc.), The English will feel like the English, the Dutch like the Dutch, etc.

4) The MINT and OVERPOPULATION will, indeed be a part of the new expansion.

Cyclades: Hades, an expansion for Cathala and Maublanc’s Cyclades, consists of four modules that can be used individually or combined in various ways. In the Cyclades base game, players fight for domination over archipelagos in ancient Greece. They make offerings to gods to secure their favors and summon mythological creatures. The Hades expansion allows players to add Hades (no surprise there) to other gods present in the base game: Zeus, Ares, Athena, Poseidon and Apollo. Players will be able to build a Necropolis and summon undead armies when they gain favors of Hades.

 

Filler Game:

Your mission, Martians, is to swoop down on the pathetic denizens of the primitive planet Earth and scoop up as many of the inhabitants as you can manage. We are interested in samples of the Chicken, Cow, and Human populations so that we can determine which of them is actually in charge. The Earthlings might manage to put up a feeble defense, but surely nothing that a small taste of your Death Rays can’t handle. Make Mars proud – be the first Martian to fill your abduction quota!

In Martian Dice you will roll 13 custom dice in an effort to set aside (“abduct”) Humans, Chickens, and Cows. With each roll you must first set aside any Tanks, representing the human military coming to fend off your alien invasion. Then you may choose one type of die to set aside as well – one of the earthlings to abduct, or Death Rays to combat the military. At the end of your turn, if you have at least as many Death Rays as Tanks, then you may abduct the earthlings you’ve been setting aside. You can’t pick any type of Earthling twice in one turn, but if you manage to abduct at least one of each you’ll score a bonus!

With each roll you will ask yourself, do you feel lucky?

 

 

Testing to see with 1 copy


Strike of the Eagle is the first game in the Fog of War series of block games to be published by Academy Games.

The year is 1920. World War I has ended, but the battle for Europe has just begun. The Soviet leaders, Lenin and Trotsky, plan to spread the workers’ revolution by blasting through Poland in order to support the growing communist movements in Germany, France and Britain. Only the armies of Poland stand in the way of the Bolshevik tide. Therefore, these armies to invade the Soviet Republics.

Strike of the Eagle is an operational level block game that allows the player to experience the tension of the Polish-Soviet War of 1920. This mobile war featured a return of sweeping cavalry attacks combined with new weaponry innovations such as planes, tanks and armored cars.

The heart of the Fog of War series lies in players placing secret orders on the map to bluff, mislead and outplay their opponents! The composition of each player’s wooden block armies remain hidden from their opponent until they are engaged in battle. Combat is resolved without dice, maximizing skillful play! Action cards are pivotal to the game in that they allow players to either modify how many orders they may issue, add army reinforcements or modify a battle’s resolution.

Strike of the Eagle includes several scenarios for 2-4 players. Some are short games that can be played in an hour, up to the full campaign that can last several hours.

Strike of the Eagle is based on The Eagle and The Star. This English edition has been totally reworked from the ground up with an expanded mounted map, new cards, streamlined rules, new army and leader blocks, new scenario setup rules and additional scenarios.



Mob Ties(TM) is a board game of negotiation, intrigue and revenge for three to six players playable in 90 – 120 minutes. During the course of the game, players assume the roles of mob bosses vying for control of a small city. Moving the members of their families between various locations on the game board, players attempt to collect cash and intimidate or work with other players’ family members to gain respect and protect their assets.

Players are dealt favor cards at the beginning of the game that include attack cards, defense cards, weapon cards and specialty cards. Each turn during the action round, players may play any or all of the cards in their hand, attacking other players’ family members in locations where they also have family members, or defending their own game pieces from attacks.

Each round, cards are drawn from the Fed Deck which determine how many and on what location Feds will be placed. If a location is surrounded by four or more Feds, the players must either defend themselves using weapons to remove one or more Feds, or vote for one among them to be pinched. If a player’s game piece is pinched by the Feds, the game piece is placed in the Prison location on the game board.

To win the game, players must successfully avoid the growing threat of the Feds and defend themselves from the encroachments of other mob families on their territories. As more family members are killed or pinched, the Heat Meter rises, eventually reaching its highest level and signaling the end of the game. Players then count their remaining game pieces and the cash they have accumulated during the course of the game and the player with the most money and respect wins.

Contents:

100 Favor Cards
50 Fed Cards
1 Game Board
1 Core Rule Book
1 Alternate & Advanced Rule Book
20 Racket Value Tokens
6 Player Aids
1 Heat Token
60 Fed Tokens
1 Don’s Ring
6 Undercover Fed Game Variation Markers
48 Mobster Game Pieces
35 Plastic Stands
1 All Bets Are Off / Honor Among Thieves Game Marker

… and lots of Kitty Cash.

(from the back of the box)

The pigs sound hungry. Above the oinks and the grunts you can hear your Associate screaming in the other room. The Don’s men have been working him over for a while now, but he hasn’t given up any names. The crisp crack of their knuckles across his face, again and again, a steady brutal rhythm, soon softens to a chorus of wet bloody thuds. Screaming gives way to begging. The sudden gunshot, a solitary flash under the door, startles you. They drag your Associate’s body off towards the expectant herd of swine at the end of the hall. Steady footsteps approach the room where you sit tied to a chair. The Don’s men have some questions for you, too.



Martin Wallace and Treefrog Games present Ankh-Morpork, set in the largest city-state in Terry Pratchett’s Discworld. Lord Vetinari has disappeared and different factions are trying to take control of the city. Each player has a secret personality with specific victory conditions, which means that you’re not sure exactly what the other players need to do in order to win.

The action takes place on a map of Ankh-Morpork, with players trying to place minions and buildings through card play. Each of the 132 cards is unique, and “the cards bring the game to life as they include most of the famous characters that have appeared in the various books. The rules are relatively simple: Play a card and do what it says. Most cards have more than one action on them, and you can choose to do some or all of these actions. Some cards also allow you to play a second card, so you can chain actions” (Wallace).

A team of artists have recreated the city and its residents for the cards, game board and box, with Bernard Pearson coordinating that team. Ankh-Morpork has been sublicensed to Mayfair Games for the North American market and Kosmos for the German market.

This game marks a diversion from Martin Wallace’s traditional designs. For his own Treefrog Games – and before that for Warfrog Games, they have been based on real-world history: trains in the UK, battles in Poland, revolutionaries in France, and so on.



Empire Building in Polynesia, 500 A.D.
From the Developer, Fred Schachter:
Conquest of Paradise is a game of empire building in the “Polynesian Triangle” of the central Pacific Ocean for two, three, or four players. Players explore the unknown ocean around them, hoping to discover the most lucrative island groups, and colonize them. They build canoes and train warriors to create a force to defend their empire, while forging lines of communication with their developing discoveries. Resources are scarce; using them wisely is a key to victory. Investing in exploration widens your empire. Building warriors strengthens your empire. Investing resources into cultural innovations can yield unexpected dividends, like tattooing, hula dancing, surfing, or even the giant moai statues of Easter Island fame.

Conquest of Paradise is a well-tested, fast-playing design geared to appeal to players who enjoy games like New World, Civilization, and Conquistador. You can learn the game in 10-15 minutes and finish a complete game in 60-90 minutes.

Conquest of Paradise is a game of exploration and empire building, but also (as you’d expect from a GMT game) CONFLICT. Choosing when to build those expensive warriors, and when and where to fight, given limited resources, is key to your success.



Colonial: Europe’s Empires Overseas is a board game about colonial times, from the Renaissance to the Industrial Revolution.

In Colonial players are the rulers of mighty European states and send their ministers to explore the earth, establish missions, ascertain scientific supremacy, and trade in exotic goods. These commodities will have to be exploited on an industrial scale and resold in Europe or in the colonies.

Set against an epic historical backdrop and using a branded Character Card-driven system, conventional dice and custom dice, this fast-paced board game requires careful management, knowledge, diplomacy and a degree of luck to lead to victory in the race for prestige.